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Return of ISIS, a New Caliphate Will Rise

Ali-Ben Hamet, Caliph of Constantinople. By Theodore Chasseriau

Ali-Ben Hamet, Caliph of Constantinople. By Theodore Chasseriau

Bombs Crush ‘ISIS’

Those that have been following the news recently will have read that the last major strongholds of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, have been liberated. Endless artillery fire reduced the cities to rubble. Yet, it leaves the Jihadis with little more than a few villages and swathes of desert to rule.  Their dream of recreating the caliphate has proven to be unattainable. The defeat of ISIS is a reason to celebrate, but we must also remain cautious.

”First, Islam never had an enlightenment where religion and state were separated. The idea of secularism is strange to Islam. Second, at no point did Muhammed say anything about leaving to Ceasar what belongs to Ceasar. The acknowledgement of a government separated from the religion is unknown to Islam.” – Clovis Institute

There Always is an Islamic Caliphate

The existence of an Islamic caliphate throughout history has been a near certainty. The current era without a clearly established caliphate is the exception rather than the rule. So what is a caliphate really? The caliph is the ruler of the caliphate and the successor of Mohammed. Basically the caliph is a title bestowed upon the leader of an Islamic empire. After all, Mohammed was a warlord and ruler. Someone had to be the successor to rule the lands he had conquered.

The caliphates generally follow Sharia law and attempt to imitate the way of Mohammad. Slavery is an acceptable practice in the caliphate. Christians must pay the additional Jizya tax to live among the Muslims. The Quran prescribes both practices.

The Dynasties

Over time the title of caliph has been passed between multiple dynasties, and at some points in time there have been multiple simultaneous claims to the title. Nonetheless, historians agree that overall there were four primary caliphates. Namely the Rashidun (632-661), the Umayyad (661-750), the Abbasid (750-1258, 1261-1517), and lastly the Ottoman (1517-1924).

Up to a century ago, there had always been a caliphate in existence in the world. Ever since the life of Muhammad up to 1924; the only break in the caliphate between 1258 and 1261 was due to the Mongol invasion of the Middle East. We are witnessing exceptional times at the moment where the Muslim world is not united under a caliph, but divided among squabbling states.

An enlightened European may now think that this is a clear indication that Muslims are no longer interested in the caliphate, that they too are turning away from religion and moving towards an atheistic, secular existence. Yet, is that what is happening in the world?

The Modern Islamic States

Only three decades after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, in 1956, Pakistan declared itself to be an independent Islamic State. Mauritania followed in 1960; this is the country that only made slavery illegal in 2007, under pressure from the international community. Iran followed in 1979 after the removal of the Shah and Afghanistan continues to be an Islamic Republic.

And these are only the countries that specifically call themselves ‘’Islamic’’, there are many more when we include countries like Saudi-Arabia that have a legal system based on Sharia law. It should be no surprise that the Saudi flag shows the text ‘’There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his prophet’’ – underlined with a sword.

Islam and Politics United

Islam goes hand in hand with politics. It will always go hand in hand with politics. The foundation of the religion matches the foundation of the Islamic State. Mohammed spread Islam across Arabia by conquest. The Quran prescribes how to govern. The religion is, realistically, a political ideology. The struggle between Saudi-Arabia and Iran comes down to a struggle over dominance in the Islamic world. Homosexuals face the death penalty upon discovery in both countries.

Keep in mind that Islam lacks two aspects. First, Islam never had an enlightenment where religion and state were separated. The idea of secularism is strange to Islam. Second, at no point did Muhammed say anything about leaving to Ceasar what belongs to Ceasar. The acknowledgement of a government separated from the religion is unknown to Islam.

So, yes, it appears that the current attempt to revive the caliphate has been halted, but that does not mean there will not be any future attempts. The union between Islam and politics is, and has always been, the standard doctrine in Islam.

3 Comments

  1. Read and know the truth

    Hundreds of historical references and quotes

    10 Myths of Islam
    http://truthmythtruth.blogspot.com

  2. Exactly, they’ll try again.

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